lodubimvloyaar:

Children Read To Shelter Cats To Soothe Them

(Photos by Animal Rescue League Of Berks County. You can follow them on Facebook.)

Also good for the kids. They encourage having slow readers read to the family pets. A dog will listen to a kid read a whole book one damn sssyl-la——-ble at a time, and it will never get frustrated, or correct their pronunciation, or start playing Angry Bird because it can’t stand listening to the slowness any more. The dog will look at the kid approvingly, because, human. Human is talking. Human is interacting.

So this is a great win-win.

(Source: dakotaangel, via heyfunniest)

lodubimvloyaar:

Children Read To Shelter Cats To Soothe Them

(Photos by Animal Rescue League Of Berks County. You can follow them on Facebook.)

Also good for the kids. They encourage having slow readers read to the family pets. A dog will listen to a kid read a whole book one damn sssyl-la——-ble at a time, and it will never get frustrated, or correct their pronunciation, or start playing Angry Bird because it can’t stand listening to the slowness any more. The dog will look at the kid approvingly, because, human. Human is talking. Human is interacting.

So this is a great win-win.

(Source: dakotaangel, via heyfunniest)

Anonymous said: Why wasn't Any protest made years ago when Brazil was chosen to host the World Cup. The money has already been spent. It’s done why are they protesting now

fotojournalismus:

Are you serious? Hope you’re just kidding. It has been going on for a long long time, nearly 700 protests took place in Brazil in 2013. Where have you been during all this time?

Here, as reminder, I’m going to put some old stuff (like headlines with some details) I pick. There you go:

2013 protests in Brazil

Brazil erupts in protest: more than a million on the streets (June 2013)

"A vast crowd filled Rio’s streets, one of a wave of huge nationwide marches against corruption, police brutality, poor public services and excess spending on the World Cup. Simultaneous demonstrations were reported in at least 80 cities.”

The World Cup riots: One million Brazilians protest at government spending £18billion on tournament (June 2013)

"Protest began against rising bus fares to pay for World Cup stadiums. Now protests target all government corruption. 

An 18-year-old was killed by a car during protests in the Sao Paolo area.”

Football becomes focus of furious outcry against corruption, police brutality, dire public services, high prices and street crime (June 2013)

"Football supporters fleeing rubber bullets, roads into stadiums blocked by angry crowds, mobs throwing stones at FIFA offices, Confederations Cup placards being ripped down and burned in the midst of mass protests.

It was all very different in 2007 when Brazil was awarded the tournament. Back then, crowds in Rio erupted with joy. In the outside world, few doubted the wisdom of the decision. Football belonged in Brazil. In the home of carnival and samba, it would be a party like no other.

But euphoria has steadily faded as preparations for 2014 have drawn attention to the persistent ills of corruption, cronyism, inequality and public insecurity.”

Brazil’s Protests: Social Inequality and World Cup Spending Fuel Mass Unrest (June 2013)

"Protesters’ grievances are united around a common theme: social inequity. They decry a political culture marked by corruption, a general lack of a return on high taxes, and point to inadequate government upkeep and spending on infrastructure, education and healthcare. That stands in stark contrast to the country’s preparations for the FIFA World Cup to the tune of some $14 billion of state investment. The tournament’s lavish funding has served to illustrate the divide between the country’s haves and have-nots.

“The government pays for the World Cup but we don’t have hospitals. We don’t have schools, education,” says, a 33-year-old human resources worker.”

Brazil protests disrupt Independence Day celebrations (September 2013)

Protests disrupt FIFA visit to Brazil World Cup venue (October 2013)

In the favelas on the frontline of protest, Brazilians ask: who is this World Cup for? (2013)

"In Fortaleza, a city of glaring inequality, 130,000 live in extreme poverty, a mother sold her baby for £15 – and a £150m stadium has been built for next year’s tournament."

> Anti-World Cup protesters clash with police after Sao Paulo rally (January 2014)

Brazilian cameraman brain dead after being injured in protest (February 2014)

Anti-World Cup protests across Brazil (May 2014)

A year has passed since photographer Sérgio Andrade da Silva lost his left eye. On June 13, 2013 — a night now known as “bloody Thursday” — Silva was documenting the fourth in a series of protests that had paralyzed the heart of São Paulo. 

"He was one of 837 Brazilians who reported injuries in protests last year.

[..] officers were not trained to properly use the “non-lethal” weapons they readily employed against mostly peaceful protesters. According to international protocol, the rubber bullet that struck Silva should have been aimed below the waist. Three other Brazilians also partially lost their vision as a result of the inappropriate use of non-lethal weapons by the military police in protests last year. 

During a hearing on Brazilian police abuse held in March at the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, a coalition of civil organizations testified that confrontations with security forces during protests had resulted in the deaths of 23 people.

Two protesters died last June after inhaling an excessive amount of tear gas, while another nine were killed during a police operation against a protest in Rio de Janeiro. The following month, a 12-year-old was shot and killed during a protest in Minas Gerais. Even the elderly were caught up in the crackdown, with the deaths of a 66-year-old woman and an 81-year-old man at the hands of police.”

Anonymous said: Why wasn't Any protest made years ago when Brazil was chosen to host the World Cup. The money has already been spent. It’s done why are they protesting now

fotojournalismus:

Are you serious? Hope you’re just kidding. It has been going on for a long long time, nearly 700 protests took place in Brazil in 2013. Where have you been during all this time?

Here, as reminder, I’m going to put some old stuff (like headlines with some details) I pick. There you go:

2013 protests in Brazil

Brazil erupts in protest: more than a million on the streets (June 2013)

"A vast crowd filled Rio’s streets, one of a wave of huge nationwide marches against corruption, police brutality, poor public services and excess spending on the World Cup. Simultaneous demonstrations were reported in at least 80 cities.”

The World Cup riots: One million Brazilians protest at government spending £18billion on tournament (June 2013)

"Protest began against rising bus fares to pay for World Cup stadiums. Now protests target all government corruption. 

An 18-year-old was killed by a car during protests in the Sao Paolo area.”

Football becomes focus of furious outcry against corruption, police brutality, dire public services, high prices and street crime (June 2013)

"Football supporters fleeing rubber bullets, roads into stadiums blocked by angry crowds, mobs throwing stones at FIFA offices, Confederations Cup placards being ripped down and burned in the midst of mass protests.

It was all very different in 2007 when Brazil was awarded the tournament. Back then, crowds in Rio erupted with joy. In the outside world, few doubted the wisdom of the decision. Football belonged in Brazil. In the home of carnival and samba, it would be a party like no other.

But euphoria has steadily faded as preparations for 2014 have drawn attention to the persistent ills of corruption, cronyism, inequality and public insecurity.”

Brazil’s Protests: Social Inequality and World Cup Spending Fuel Mass Unrest (June 2013)

"Protesters’ grievances are united around a common theme: social inequity. They decry a political culture marked by corruption, a general lack of a return on high taxes, and point to inadequate government upkeep and spending on infrastructure, education and healthcare. That stands in stark contrast to the country’s preparations for the FIFA World Cup to the tune of some $14 billion of state investment. The tournament’s lavish funding has served to illustrate the divide between the country’s haves and have-nots.

“The government pays for the World Cup but we don’t have hospitals. We don’t have schools, education,” says, a 33-year-old human resources worker.”

Brazil protests disrupt Independence Day celebrations (September 2013)

Protests disrupt FIFA visit to Brazil World Cup venue (October 2013)

In the favelas on the frontline of protest, Brazilians ask: who is this World Cup for? (2013)

"In Fortaleza, a city of glaring inequality, 130,000 live in extreme poverty, a mother sold her baby for £15 – and a £150m stadium has been built for next year’s tournament."

> Anti-World Cup protesters clash with police after Sao Paulo rally (January 2014)

Brazilian cameraman brain dead after being injured in protest (February 2014)

Anti-World Cup protests across Brazil (May 2014)

A year has passed since photographer Sérgio Andrade da Silva lost his left eye. On June 13, 2013 — a night now known as “bloody Thursday” — Silva was documenting the fourth in a series of protests that had paralyzed the heart of São Paulo. 

"He was one of 837 Brazilians who reported injuries in protests last year.

[..] officers were not trained to properly use the “non-lethal” weapons they readily employed against mostly peaceful protesters. According to international protocol, the rubber bullet that struck Silva should have been aimed below the waist. Three other Brazilians also partially lost their vision as a result of the inappropriate use of non-lethal weapons by the military police in protests last year. 

During a hearing on Brazilian police abuse held in March at the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, a coalition of civil organizations testified that confrontations with security forces during protests had resulted in the deaths of 23 people.

Two protesters died last June after inhaling an excessive amount of tear gas, while another nine were killed during a police operation against a protest in Rio de Janeiro. The following month, a 12-year-old was shot and killed during a protest in Minas Gerais. Even the elderly were caught up in the crackdown, with the deaths of a 66-year-old woman and an 81-year-old man at the hands of police.”

heyfunniest:

heyfunniest:

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heyfunniest:

heyfunniest:

Daily Use:

School:

Food in under 10 minutes:

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victor made my tumblr!

victor made my tumblr!

(Source: morvencann, via dutchster)

chronicdelight:

jbillz709:

The Selfie Hand Shake

I’m making this a thing

chronicdelight:

jbillz709:

The Selfie Hand Shake

I’m making this a thing

(via dutchster)

chronicdelight:

jbillz709:

The Selfie Hand Shake

I’m making this a thing

chronicdelight:

jbillz709:

The Selfie Hand Shake

I’m making this a thing

(via dutchster)

chronicdelight:

jbillz709:

The Selfie Hand Shake

I’m making this a thing

chronicdelight:

jbillz709:

The Selfie Hand Shake

I’m making this a thing

(via dutchster)

tastefullyoffensive:

[flaxwenchpromise]

seen this a few times.  has made me giggle each time.

tastefullyoffensive:

[flaxwenchpromise]

seen this a few times.  has made me giggle each time.

By far
the finest tumblr
theme ever
created
by a crazy man
in Russia